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What to consider when your child is prescribed a compounded medication

Extemporaneous preparation of oral suspensions, creams, and ointments by pharmacists is of great importance for the pediatric population. Why? The “one size fits all” model doesn’t work for kids. Dosing for kids is mostly weight-based and is calculated milligram(drug)/kilogram (child’s weight) or dosed based on the child’s body surface area. Most compounded preparations for pediatric patients are considered to be “simple compounds” in that there are only 2 to 3 ingredients in the compound; the drug (crushed tablets or bulk powder) and a suspending agent (simple syrup, ora-blend, cherry syrup).

Parents needing compounding services for their children run into road blocks because not every pharmacy compounds. My suggestion for parents is that they discuss with their pediatrician where compounding pharmacies are located in their area before leaving the doctor’s office or hospital. Parents, if you’re uncertain if a drug needs to be compounded, please ask the pediatrician when he or she writes the prescription.

Typically the pediatrician will be aware of community pharmacies in the area that provide compounding as a service. Some pharmacies in your area may even solely focus on pediatric patients.

When the parent finds a pharmacy they want to use by physician referral, web search, or even word of mouth please give that pharmacy a phone call to ensure that the pharmacy accepts your child’s insurance.

If you have questions or concerns about the compounded medication your child will receive never hesitate to ask to speak to the pharmacist on duty or the pharmacy supervisor. Consultation should always be offered, but never hesitate to speak up on your child’s behalf. The pharmacist should be able to provide information about the drug, how the compound is prepared, how it should be stored, and be able to discuss side effects and concerns that parents typically have with the associated compounded medication.

Lastly, parents please give the pharmacy sufficient time to compound the medication. Compounding is a process that shouldn’t be rushed. Pharmacists must work with their staff to ensure the proper protocol for compounding is followed to ensure patient safety. Typical turn around for compounded medications can sometimes be 24 to 48 hours depending on the pharmacies volume and workflow.

For information about compounded medications please check out the FDA’s website regarding the topic: https://www.fda.gov/drugs/guidancecomplianceregulatoryinformation/pharmacycompounding/ucm339764.htm

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Sam Blakemore is the Pharmacy Manager of Peds Rx Pharmacy Solutions. Connect with him via: LinkedIn

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Medication adherence: how parent’s can keep track of their child’s medicine

“Medication adherence” has become a big topic of discussion. A quick Google search of medication adherence as it relates to rising healthcare costs will lead readers to thousands of news articles.

In this article I will discuss some tips on how to help your child adhere to his/her medication regimen.

1.  Pen and paper – If you don’t write it down it never happened. Write down the time and day the medicine was given.

2.  Set the alarm– Set an alarm on your phone so that you can remember to give your child their medication.

3.  Phone apps– There are some phone apps that can be easily downloaded on your smart phone to help track when medications should be administered.

4.  Pill box organizers– Using weekly or monthly pill box organizers can be very helpful for some parents. Discuss with your child’s pediatrician to find out if this is a suitable option for you and your child. First, pill box organizers can’t be used if your child is on liquid medications. Second, the pediatrician will need to discuss with his or her staff to ensure that this can be done safely and effectively by the parent. Lastly, the use of pill box organizers is not suitable for parent’s that can not keep both children and adults out of reach from inappropriate use of the medicine. Appropriate education of families needs to be done by both prescriber, pharmacist, and nurse to ensure everyone is on the same page.

5.  Print off a calendar month– Work with your child’s healthcare team on using a printed calendar month that denotes time, day, and dose to administer to the child. This visual cue will ensure that your child gets the right medicine on the right days. I typically see this method used with kids that are being tapered up, down, or off medicine.

6.  Bottle for school use– If the medication is being administered both at home and at school then you can discuss with your pediatrician about having a prescription written in a manner to have the pharmacy dispense a bottle for both home and school use. For example, a child is to take the medicine at 8am, noon, and as needed at 4pm. The prescriber requests for the pharmacist to dispense a quantity of 90 tablets. The prescriber can write on the prescription to dispense 60 tablets in a bottle for home use and 30 tablets in a bottle for school use.

Remember to do what works. Use one of the methods or a combination of the methods that I’ve outlined. At the end of the day, the only thing that matters is that your child receives the medicine the way it’s been prescribed.

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Sam Blakemore is the Pharmacy Manager of Peds Rx Pharmacy Solutions. Connect with him via: LinkedIn

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The cost of pharmaceutical compounding…

“Ya’ll charged me $45, and the pharmacy up the street said they were gonna charge me $400!”

When searching for a pharmacy that compounds; ask the pharmacist if they’re able to file a claim for the prescription under the patient’s pharmacy benefits policy.

If a member of the staff states that the pharmacy can not file the claim under the pharmacy benefits ask the following questions:

  1. Did you attempt to file the claim under the benefits policy?
  2. If an attempt was made to file the claim on the policy; why was the claim rejected? What were the rejection codes?
  3. When the claim was filed under the benefits plan did the rejection message include a phone number?

A typical rejection for a compound claim is ingredient(s) non covered/ product service non covered. The phone number listed on the rejected claim can be used by the prescriber or pharmacist to call on your behalf and gain additional information as to why the claim rejected and if additional paperwork can be submitted on the patient’s behalf to get the compound covered under the patient’s benefits policy.

In regards to pricing — the things that a pharmacy takes into consideration when setting a price are as follows:

  1. Cost of Drug
  2. Cost of Suspending Agents/Flavorings/Preservatives
  3. Compounding Dispensing Fees — this factors in the overhead of producing the final product (labels, tech time, gloves, equipment, etc.)

From there, the pharmacy calculates pricing based on the following principles:

  1. The “Breakeven Price”— this is the price that can be set where the business loses no money.
  2. The price markup factors — Imagine if the cost of producing the product is $5. The business can then say their markup factor is 2. A markup factor of 2 means the selling price is $10. Gross profit margin can then be calculated as (Revenue-Cost)/Revenue. Thus, profit margin in the above scenario is 50%.
  3. Supply and demand — The greater the supply the less the demand and the less supply garners greater demand. Price therefore can shift up and down based on conditions in the market.
  4. Drug shortages in the market can induce price increases.

Be an informed customer at your community pharmacy. Asking questions about compounding can lead some of your pharmacist friends to talk your ear off.

Questioning your pharmacist on this topic will provide that pharmacist with an opportunity to teach, learn, and build trust with a member of their community.

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Sam Blakemore is the Pharmacy Manager of Peds Rx Pharmacy Solutions. Connect with him via: LinkedIn