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Session 2 — July 12, 2018 — Lecture 5

Session 2 — July 12, 2018 — Lecture 5

Lecture Handout PDF: Errors and Omissions — July 12, 2018

Audio: 

YouTube Video  — produced by Purdue University in regards to “Medication Errors”

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Sam Blakemore is the Pharmacy Manager of Peds Rx Pharmacy Solutions. Connect with him via: LinkedIn

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Session 2 — July 5, 2018 — Lecture 4

Session 2 — July 5, 2018 — Lecture 4

Audio from July 5, 2018 Lecture

Please review Session 2 — Quiz 3 — July 5, 2018 & Preparation for Quiz 3 and lecture on July 5th 2018

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Sam Blakemore is the Pharmacy Manager of Peds Rx Pharmacy Solutions. Connect with him via: LinkedIn

Session 2 — Quiz 3 — July 5, 2018

Session 2 — Quiz 3 — July 5, 2018

Audio for Session 2 — Lecture 4 — July 5, 2018 will be published next Wednesday July 11, 2018 

Please review Quiz 3

After reviewing this Quiz, please review Session 2 — Quiz 1 & Quiz 2 PDF Documents

Please review the links from the previous post Preparation for Quiz 3 and lecture on July 5th 2018

Keep Studying! This session is almost complete!

For questions please feel free to contact me. Have a great weekend!

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Sam Blakemore is the Pharmacy Manager of Peds Rx Pharmacy Solutions. Connect with him via: LinkedIn

 

I’m Sam Blakemore — Welcome to my blog

I’m Sam Blakemore — Welcome to my blog

Hello. I’m Sam, and I’m a Pharmacist that has a passion for the practice of Pharmacy.

Our profession is growing by leaps and bounds each and every day. And our growth in the healthcare community can only fully take shape by how well we train our pharmacy techs to help us fulfill our daily duties and responsibilities to both patients and the community.

Thus, my blog.. This blog on pharmacy and management is a collection of my thoughts, opinions, and lecture materials from the pharmacy tech class that I teach. If you have questions or concerns for me, just find me on LinkedIn.

I’ll share with you this brief YouTube Video of me that was produced by Samford University’s McWhorter School of Pharmacy in 2015:

 

 

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Sam Blakemore is the Pharmacy Manager of Peds Rx Pharmacy Solutions. Connect with him via: LinkedIn

The Good Teacher

The Good Teacher

Teaching is difficult. Teachers — especially the great teachers, they just don’t receive enough credit. I have actively been teaching a non credit pharmacy technician class the past 8 weeks, while also performing Preceptor duties for 4th year Pharmacy School students.

What have I learned while doing both simultaneously? 

Obviously the biggest difference is that teaching in the community pharmacy is a more hands on experience in that there’s real life scenarios and people versus teaching in the classroom where there’s only the lecturer, student, book, and  white board/chalk board to convey the message.

In the classroom there’s the “audience effect”. You’re lecturing, and you can easily become the only speaker if there’s not a question you give your audience to answer.  Thus, you have to exert more of your body and brain energy into focused segments to convey an effective message.

This burden of energy expenditure being on the speaker/lecturer can be lightened only by actively engaging the student by using the white board, computer, or book to create examples and questions of real life scenarios.

Energy expenditure while teaching in the pharmacy is reduced in comparison to the classroom. The drugs, the patients, the real life scenarios are there to be be used as living examples of why the student must study physiology, pharmacology, infectious disease, pharmaceutics, and so on and so forth.

The student can easily view the drug by going to the shelf. They can learn the pharmacology and use of the drug by simply looking at the package insert that comes with the drug. They can observe the practicing pharmacist or pharmacy technician and learn from their behaviors, movements, speech, and thought process in working together as a team to produce the appropriate final product. The examples do not have to be created in the pharmacy — because the examples are there to be observed, studied, learned, and memorized for the present and future use with patients that day and the days ahead.

This accumulation of knowledge by the pharmacy student and pharmacy technician while on externship can produce a foundation of knowledge for how to talk, when to talk, when not to talk, and when to act.

First point… Good teaching isn’t a lecture, it’s a conversation.

Second point… Good teachers find common ground with the student — so that the thoughts expressed by the teacher can be easily understood by the student.

Third point…Good teachers find out what their student’s baseline of knowledge is.  By understanding their current knowledge or lack thereof — the Good teacher can elevate and motivate the student to an appropriate and/or desired level of competency.

Conclusion — I have a long way to go in becoming identified as one of the “good teachers”. However, I’ve identified these three points too consider while playing this role.

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Sam Blakemore is the Pharmacy Manager of Peds Rx Pharmacy Solutions. Connect with him via: LinkedIn

“Ready to Work” initiatives and The Pharmacy Technician

“Ready to Work” initiatives and The Pharmacy Technician

The practice of pharmacy grows by leaps and bounds each and everyday.

The education of Student Pharmacists to take on both current & emerging roles in providing pharmaceutical care has occurred and continues to evolve. I have a firm belief that this education will satisfactorily meet and exceed the needs of both current and future patients.

While the Pharmacists education is well defined in that Boards of Pharmacy and National Associations have criteria that you must meet prior to entry into the profession. The Pharmacy Technician’s education is not as well defined. Currently technicians are educated by for-profit institutions, some but not all Community Colleges, and there are some online programs.

Question??

How can Pharmacists fully utilize their education and knowledge in both current and emerging markets – if there is not an appropriate and affordable education model to satisfactorily keep pace with pharmacy technician demand in the market?

It’s my opinion that the greatest demand for the Pharmacy Technician will be in the retail sector. There is a high turnover rate in this market and typically this is the space where an organization can take on registered pharmacy technicians that have no pharmacy experience. With an increase in mergers and acquisitions between chain pharmacy, benefit managers, and health insurers – the demand for registered pharmacy technicians will continue to increase.

Current state laws will also need to keep pace with changes in how both Pharmacists and Pharmacy Technicians are utilized in the Pharmacy.

  1. Telemedicine
  2. Pharmacy Technician verification via Barcode technology (http://www.ajhp.org/content/73/2/69?sso-checked=true)
  3. Medication therapy management
  4. Pharmacist Practitioners
  5. Collaborative practice models
  6. The increased market-share of “specialty pharmacy”
  7. Compounding pharmacies regulated by federal guidelines USP 795, 797, and 800

These are all topics to consider when considering the job market and demand for both the practicing Pharmacist and Pharmacy Technician.

What can fill the education gap?

I had never heard of the “Ready to Work” initiatives taking place in Birmingham, AL. But after meeting Ms. Dorothy Henry and leadership at Lawson State Community College — I stumbled upon an institution that is at the forefront of this community based initiative.

Ready to Work programs can offer job seekers foundational knowledge to take on entry level job positions. “Ready to Work” educational healthcare tracks include medical assistant, patient care assistant, and pharmacy technician. These programs help folks learn how to become registered and/or certified to take on entry level positions in the workforce.

Having a job that you care about and enjoy is good for the individual because it increases self-worth. It’s good for the family because it provides a stable source of income. It’s great for both the community and local economy because the money can be recycled into tangible purchases of goods, services, and long term assets.

I’ve had the pleasure of working with folks interested in becoming registered Pharmacy Technicians through this program. And I really believe that this could be an opportunity where more Pharmacists can serve and become involved in helping young people find a career in their local community. Programs like this help to ensure that there are affordable avenues for people to learn and become aware of professions that can be a source for both a rewarding career and steady income. I have posted my lecture materials online at www.samblakemore.com . Feel free to follow along and give back any comments and/or positive feedback.

Sam Blakemore is the Pharmacy Manager of Peds Rx Pharmacy Solutions. Connect with him via: LinkedIn