Advertisements

Session 2 — Quiz 1 & Quiz 2

Session 2 — Quiz 1 & Quiz 2
  • Prior to each quiz we will review material for 10 to 15 minutes.
  • You will then have 45 minutes to complete the quiz (This will consume the first hour of the class)
  • The quiz will be taken up. Graded and returned to the student in 1 to 2 class sessions.
  • After the quiz is administered we will have a brief break and begin a short lecture over material outlined in the syllabus. Syllabus Session-2 June-August 2018

Quiz 1 will be on June 26th, 2018. The quiz will be 50 questions.

Quiz 1 will be based on the first two pages of the Top 200 drugs list that was given out in class June 19th.

  1. Category: Pain Medication — Type Question: Fill in the Blank & Matching
  2. Category: Anti-Infectives — Type Question: Fill in the Blank & Matching
  3. Category: Cardiovascular — Type Question: Fill in the Blank
  4. Category: Cholesterol — Type Question: Matching
  5. Category: Blood Pressure — Type Question: Matching & Fill in the Blank

_______________________

Quiz 2 will be on June 28th, 2018. The quiz will be 50 questions. You will not need a calculator! 

  1. Category: Timing of Administration — Type Question: Fill in the Blank (example: qd, bid, tid)
  2. Category: Measurement — Type Question: Fill in the Blank (example: tsp, tbsp, ounce)
  3. Category: Route of Administration — Type Question: Fill in the Blank (example: po = by mouth)
  4. Category: Pharmacy Law — Type Question: Multiple Choice
  5. Category: Days Supply — Type Question: Fill in the Blank

___________________

Quiz 1 and Quiz 2 will be posted Saturday June 30th, 2018 for your review.

Thank you for your efforts. Please study hard and take the materials seriously and you should do fine on the quizzes. Best of Luck!

For questions or concerns please email me.

 

Advertisements

Session 2 — June 14, 2018 — Lecture 1

Session 2 — June 14, 2018 — Lecture 1

PDF of Syllabus Session 2: Syllabus Session-2 June-August 2018

PDF of Lecture 1 Notes: Lecture 1 — June 14, 2018

MP4 Audio of Lecture 1:

_____

Homework: Please review the web-links in the PDF documents. Study Lecture 1 Notes — do appropriate web-searches of the material outlined in the Lecture Notes. Review Top 200 quiz on PTCB Website: http://www.ptcbpracticetest.com/top-200-drugs-quiz/

_____

Have a great weekend and questions or concerns please feel free to email.

The Good Teacher

The Good Teacher

Teaching is difficult. Teachers — especially the great teachers, they just don’t receive enough credit. I have actively been teaching a non credit pharmacy technician class the past 8 weeks, while also performing Preceptor duties for 4th year Pharmacy School students.

What have I learned while doing both simultaneously? 

Obviously the biggest difference is that teaching in the community pharmacy is a more hands on experience in that there’s real life scenarios and people versus teaching in the classroom where there’s only the lecturer, student, book, and  white board/chalk board to convey the message.

In the classroom there’s the “audience effect”. You’re lecturing, and you can easily become the only speaker if there’s not a question you give your audience to answer.  Thus, you have to exert more of your body and brain energy into focused segments to convey an effective message.

This burden of energy expenditure being on the speaker/lecturer can be lightened only by actively engaging the student by using the white board, computer, or book to create examples and questions of real life scenarios.

Energy expenditure while teaching in the pharmacy is reduced in comparison to the classroom. The drugs, the patients, the real life scenarios are there to be be used as living examples of why the student must study physiology, pharmacology, infectious disease, pharmaceutics, and so on and so forth.

The student can easily view the drug by going to the shelf. They can learn the pharmacology and use of the drug by simply looking at the package insert that comes with the drug. They can observe the practicing pharmacist or pharmacy technician and learn from their behaviors, movements, speech, and thought process in working together as a team to produce the appropriate final product. The examples do not have to be created in the pharmacy — because the examples are there to be observed, studied, learned, and memorized for the present and future use with patients that day and the days ahead.

This accumulation of knowledge by the pharmacy student and pharmacy technician while on externship can produce a foundation of knowledge for how to talk, when to talk, when not to talk, and when to act.

First point… Good teaching isn’t a lecture, it’s a conversation.

Second point… Good teachers find common ground with the student — so that the thoughts expressed by the teacher can be easily understood by the student.

Third point…Good teachers find out what their student’s baseline of knowledge is.  By understanding their current knowledge or lack thereof — the Good teacher can elevate and motivate the student to an appropriate and/or desired level of competency.

Conclusion — I have a long way to go in becoming identified as one of the “good teachers”. However, I’ve identified these three points too consider while playing this role.

______

Sam Blakemore is the Pharmacy Manager of Peds Rx Pharmacy Solutions. Connect with him via: LinkedIn

The increasing use of DAW 9 and it’s potential impact on pharmaceutical care…

The Dispense As Written Codes that I use regularly in my practice are:

DAW 0 = NO PRODUCT SELECTION INDICATED

DAW 1 = SUBSTITUTION NOT ALLOWED BY PRESCRIBER

DAW 9 = SUBSTITUTION ALLOWED PLAN REQUESTS BRAND

Why is this important?

Dispense as written codes are important in billing/filing claims correctly to a patient’s insurance plan. Claims must be billed/filed correctly so that patients receive the appropriate drug products at the correct price.

For me… DAW 0 is used most of the time (this holds true for most pharmacists), while DAW 1 is used sparingly; a drug example for those who are not Pharmacists as to when a Pharmacist uses DAW 1 is seen in the case of  prescribing Brand Name Synthroid. Prescribers often write for Brand name Synthroid instead of Levothyroxine because this drug has a Narrow Therapeutic Index (NTI). Due to the NTI, formularies often include both the Brand and Generic products on their formularies so that patients receive appropriate pharmaceutical treatment for their thyroid conditions.

If you’re interested in reading more about NTI, please visit the FDA’s website and review the powerpoint “Quality and Bioequivalence Standards for Narrow Therapeutic Index Drugs.

So…DAW 9?

DAW 9 is increasingly becoming popular and being put into place by Pharmacy Benefit Managers (PBM’s). Typically generics have been dispensed because the generic product is the cheaper alternative when compared to the brand name product. However, increasingly manufacturers have been offering PBM’s rebates for the monies that they pay the pharmacies on the drugs cost.

In short…even when prescribers write a prescription and sign Product Substitution Permitted — the pharmacist must dispense the brand name product for the product to be covered by the patient’s insurance. This is done by changing the computer DAW code from a 0 to a 9.

So you may be asking, “how is it more profitable for the PBM’s to have higher priced drugs on their drug formularies?” I found a great article published by NCPA entitled “PBM Revenue Streams and Lack of Transparency”. The article is a quick read and outlines why Brand Name products continue to be on formulary even when a generic competitor enters the market.

Examples of using DAW 9 in my practice (Generic Drug — Condition Treated)

Dexmethylphenidate ER — ADHD

Diazepam Rectal Gel — Seizures

Methylphenidate ER — ADHD

Budesonide Respules — Asthma

What’s the effect on people and the market?

In my practice this leads to a major consultation point…

  • You and/or your family member is on a drug that insurance is requiring that Brand Name be dispensed (DAW 9). I’m not sure if your local pharmacy carries the Brand Name or Generic product. Thus, it is imperative that you contact your pharmacy days in advance to ensure this product is in stock when you attempt to refill your medication. If you don’t call ahead of time, this could potentially delay when you receive your medication, which could lead you to become non-compliant with your medication(s).

The reason that this is so important…

  • Finding the medication for your patient is important…but ensuring that your patient has access to this medication is just as important. If they can’t obtain or access the medication, then you can’t ensure their compliance on the medicine. And non-compliance ultimately can lead to hospital readmission.
  • When patient’s transition from an inpatient admission to being discharged to the outpatient setting, prescribers are often unaware of what’s on or not on the patient’s drug formularies. This can lead to confusion and delay and/or impede discharge planning which can potentially lengthen their hospital admission.

DAW 0 versus DAW 9 seems like such a trivial issue, but the increased prevalence of this small change can impact our patient’s compliance and can drive up the cost for providing healthcare.

If you have Questions related to this topic? Please feel free to leave a comment.

___

Sam Blakemore is the Pharmacy Manager of Peds Rx Pharmacy Solutions. Connect with him via: LinkedIn

 

Screen Shot 2018-01-06 at 12.53.05 AM

How to determine if a candidate “cares”..

How to determine if a candidate “cares”..

The interview begins—and you have already reviewed the candidate’s resume’. They meet all the qualifications, and even have some excellent references. You hire the candidate, and around six months to one year later after their up and down performance you and the employee decide that it’s best to part ways.

So what happened? The interview went well…check. The references seemed to be great…check. Yet, once the candidate got the job — they had a fatal flaw that was impossible to overcome.

They just didn’t seem to care.

They didn’t care about the customers, didn’t care about their daily performance, didn’t even seem to care about their evaluations… Which ultimately meant that the product they were serving up to your loyal base was average at best. They had just enough good days to make you think maybe it would work out, interspersed with enough bad days to make you shake your head.

It’s pretty weird when you think about it. And naturally, you have to feel a bit disappointed. Typically, I’ll even replay their interview over in my mind; trying to figure out what I missed during my evaluation. Going through this process forces the manager to ask themselves what checkboxes are the most important to be checked before making a commitment to offer the candidate a position.

A few days ago, a colleague reminded me of her words on the hiring process prior to me taking on a management position. She’s held multiple management positions. And she said, “when you hire someone, find a person with good customer service…if the person has good customer service, you can typically work around some of their deficiencies…”

I would add to her statement — that the job candidate’s deficiencies can even be remedied with appropriate teaching and training. So, then the manager must ask themselves, “am I a good enough teacher/trainer to remedy the candidate’s deficiency or do I currently have someone on staff that can be an appropriate educator/mentor for the job candidate?”

I don’t know of any degrees/diplomas to my knowledge that are being conferred by colleges and universities in the field/study of CARING @ WORK. Thus, what questions could be asked to determine if a candidate meets your standards? I guess… you could simply just ask the magical question, “do you care… or will you care? But, unfortunately you will most likely just get a canned answer.

So I suggest going through what-if scenarios with your candidate using a diagram for what you consider to be right and wrong answers for each of your scenarios. This I believe is the best method for gaining a little more insight into determining if a candidate truly possesses the traits required to serve your customer base.

______

Sam Blakemore is the Pharmacy Manager of Peds Rx Pharmacy Solutions. Connect with him via: LinkedIn

Writing in Plain English…

Learning how to write in plain English has been one of the most useful concepts I have learned. Effective written communication is a business litmus test. If done well, it can help the business professional build their personal brand.

Plain English is defined in Wikipedia as being…

A style of communication that uses easy to understand, plain language, with an emphasis on clarity, and avoidance of complex vocabulary.

Personally, this has been extremely important to me in the following areas:

  1. Writing business emails to convey a message the reader can easily understand.
  2. Writing incident reports to convey a message that anyone could understand.
  3. Designing business correspondence to customers regarding new services.
  4. Designing operations & workflow management forms to ensure quality employee performance that leads to better customer service.

Thus, out of respect to the the art of writing in Plain English this is the conclusion of this blog post.

For further information click this. And if you really get bored and want to read a book — I would suggest the following, Writing & Speaking at Work by Edward P. Bailey.

Regards, Sam

_____

Sam Blakemore is the Pharmacy Manager of Peds Rx Pharmacy Solutions. Connect with him via: LinkedIn