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Pharmacy Technician Lessons 2019

The course will be completed using your standard textbooks and my lesson manual.

I will upload my personal lecture audio under this post throughout our 8 weeks together.

The lesson manual includes content covering 8 lessons, quizzes, previous final exams, and information pertaining to how to conduct yourself on externship. Please use this manual as your guide to complete this course. It will take both in class and out of class studying to complete each of the 8 lessons. Each lesson should take you at least 4 hours to cover.

Please refer back to the lessons as needed.

I will not print lessons, it is up to you to follow the material accordingly. The links are below.

Location:

Lawson State Community College

1100 Ninth Ave SW

Bessemer, AL 35022

Classroom to be used: Ethel Hall Building – Room 201

Time:  9:00am – 10:30am

PDF’s for download:

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Lessons for the Pharmacy Technician 2019

Course Syllabus May-June 2019 Lawson Pharmacy Technician

 

Audio:

May 1, 2019 Lecture on Lesson 1 :

Part 1:

Part 2:

May 7, 2019 Lecture on Lesson 2: 

Part 1:

Part 2:


May 14, 2019 Quiz 1: 

Quiz 1 will be given on May 14, 2019. You will have 45 minutes to complete the quiz (9am – 945am). There will be a brief break and then a review of the quiz by your instructor for the remainder of the class.

Quiz 2 for May 15, 2019 will be rescheduled. We will instead cover Lesson 3 and go into more depth review of the material thus far.  We will also have a lab to get hands on knowledge of the material covered.

Homework — please continue to keep studying the top 200 drugs from your text. You should now be memorizing pages 4, 5, and 6 of the top 200 from your workbook.

Quiz 1 May 2019

Quiz 1 Answers May 2019

The class average for quiz 1 was 68%.


May 15, 2019 

May 15, 2019 Audio Part 1:

May 15, 2019 Audio Part 2:

Quiz 2 will be next Wednesday May 22, 2019 over the top 200. Use previous quizzes from last year to study for Quiz 2. There will be 75 questions on quiz 2 and you will have 1 hour to complete the quiz.

To receive extra credit on quiz 2, please look over the top 200 and type up a summary on 25 drugs of your choice. For each medication — list the brand name of the drug, the generic name of the drug, the classification of the drug, and the body part the drug acts on.

For example… ProAir HFA is an inhaler and is classified as a respiratory agent, the generic name is Albuterol HFA and the body part that the drug acts on is the lungs. The drug acts in a manner to open the airways so that a person can breath normally.

If you type up 25 drugs and do it as I’ve asked you, you can receive up to 25 points extra credit on quiz 2. Remember, it must be typed!!! And you must turn this in on Tuesday May 21, 2019 to receive credit. 

Please continue to look over the externship material. Sign the final page of the agreement, informing me that you’re committed to a 40 hour externship, and please talk to DHR and/or JCCEO to inform them of your intentions to become a registered pharmacy technician — you need to be registered prior to going on externship. This costs $103.


Tuesday May 21, 2019 we reviewed Lesson 3 and began covering Lesson 4. We finished the first problem in Lesson 5. Please work on the second question in Lesson 5 and read Chapter 6.

Audio from Tuesday May 21, 2019:


Wednesday May 22, 2019 the second quiz for this session was administered.

Quiz 2 2019 and Quiz 2 2019 – Answers

After taking into account the 25 point bonus — the class average for quiz 2 was 77.8%

A review of Chapter 6 continued during this lecture post quiz. Please continue to work on Chapter 6 and review Lesson 1-Lesson 5 for class next week.


Tuesday May 28, 2019 the third quiz was administered by Janiece. All those present received a 100% on the quiz.

Wednesday May 29, 2019 we completed Lesson 7 — please continue to review Lesson 7. We reviewed Lesson 5.

Lecture Audio May 29, 2019:

For Quiz 4 prepare in this way:

  • Memorize section A conversions from Lesson 5
  • Be prepared to answer multiple choice questions that relate to prescription examples Baby Girl Roberts, Janet Jackson, and Henry Ford from Lesson 5.
  • Lastly, review the Alligation Hydrocortisone example that can be found on page 184 in your text. This example will be used for your quiz.

June 4, 2019 the quiz will be 25 questions. We will then review Quiz 4 –> proceed to  a lab on compounding –> and review Lesson 8. 

Please review your syllabus, our time together is nearing the end. 

June 4 — Quiz 4 and practical compounding lab

June 18 — Final Exam

June 19 — Review of the Final Exam administered on the 18th and Final Grades

  • Please continue to study, work diligently on your pharmacy technician registration, work on your resume’, and begin submitting applications to local pharmacies
  • If you find a job as a pharmacy technician or as a pharmacy cashier prior to externship, you will  not have to complete an externship.

50 point extra credit!!!!!!

Write two paragraphs describing each lesson that we have completed thus far. We have completed Lessons 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7. 

Give 2 examples from each lesson and why each example is important in becoming a pharmacy technician.

For example in your paragraph you describe Pharmacy Technician Registration in the State of Alabama…

 In Lesson 1 we discussed how to become registered as a pharmacy technician. It is important that pharmacy technicians know that in the State of Alabama we register by using albop.com. The annual fee is $103 with renewals occurring in odd years.

Remember 2 examples from each lesson, each example should be 1 paragraph in length. This must be typed. 12 point font. Times New Roman. Double spaced.


June 4 2019

June 4 2019 Audio

Quiz 4 2019

lab 2 2019

If anytime remains we will begin covering Lesson 8.

Externships will be emailed out this Friday June 8, 2019. It is your responsibility to contact the Pharmacy Managers/Lead Technicians to setup days that you can complete your 40 hours of training. You will have 3 weeks to complete training. You are exempt from externship if you have found a job in Pharmacy.


June 11 2019 — Janiece will cover Lesson 8/Discuss Externship

June 12 2019 — Practice Final Examination/Discuss Externship

Link to practice final exam — please use your books and internet to study

Session 2 — July 31, 2018 — Final Exam

The final exam will be 60 questions, you will have the full class session to complete.

Topics to cover: pharmacy workflow, prescription benefit card, math conversions, sig codes, pharmacy law, brand/genetics, and pharmacy math!


June 18 2019 — Final Exam/Questions/Discuss Externship — we need copies of your pharmacy tech registrations!


June 19 2019 — Final Grades/Review Final Exam/Questions/Discuss Externship


Sam Blakemore IMG_1742 is the Pharmacy Manager of Peds Rx Pharmacy Solutions. Connect with him via: LinkedInSupport the effort and BUY MERCH

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Session 2 — Quiz 1 & Quiz 2

Session 2 — Quiz 1 & Quiz 2
  • Prior to each quiz we will review material for 10 to 15 minutes.
  • You will then have 45 minutes to complete the quiz (This will consume the first hour of the class)
  • The quiz will be taken up. Graded and returned to the student in 1 to 2 class sessions.
  • After the quiz is administered we will have a brief break and begin a short lecture over material outlined in the syllabus. Syllabus Session-2 June-August 2018

Quiz 1 will be on June 26th, 2018. The quiz will be 50 questions.

Quiz 1 will be based on the first two pages of the Top 200 drugs list that was given out in class June 19th.

  1. Category: Pain Medication — Type Question: Fill in the Blank & Matching
  2. Category: Anti-Infectives — Type Question: Fill in the Blank & Matching
  3. Category: Cardiovascular — Type Question: Fill in the Blank
  4. Category: Cholesterol — Type Question: Matching
  5. Category: Blood Pressure — Type Question: Matching & Fill in the Blank

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Quiz 2 will be on June 28th, 2018. The quiz will be 50 questions. You will not need a calculator! 

  1. Category: Timing of Administration — Type Question: Fill in the Blank (example: qd, bid, tid)
  2. Category: Measurement — Type Question: Fill in the Blank (example: tsp, tbsp, ounce)
  3. Category: Route of Administration — Type Question: Fill in the Blank (example: po = by mouth)
  4. Category: Pharmacy Law — Type Question: Multiple Choice
  5. Category: Days Supply — Type Question: Fill in the Blank

___________________

Quiz 1 and Quiz 2 will be posted Saturday June 30th, 2018 for your review.

Thank you for your efforts. Please study hard and take the materials seriously and you should do fine on the quizzes. Best of Luck!

For questions or concerns please email me.

 

Session 2 — June 14, 2018 — Lecture 1

Session 2 — June 14, 2018 — Lecture 1

PDF of Syllabus Session 2: Syllabus Session-2 June-August 2018

PDF of Lecture 1 Notes: Lecture 1 — June 14, 2018

MP4 Audio of Lecture 1:

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Homework: Please review the web-links in the PDF documents. Study Lecture 1 Notes — do appropriate web-searches of the material outlined in the Lecture Notes. Review Top 200 quiz on PTCB Website: http://www.ptcbpracticetest.com/top-200-drugs-quiz/

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Have a great weekend and questions or concerns please feel free to email.

The Good Teacher

The Good Teacher

Teaching is difficult. Teachers — especially the great teachers, they just don’t receive enough credit. I have actively been teaching a non credit pharmacy technician class the past 8 weeks, while also performing Preceptor duties for 4th year Pharmacy School students.

What have I learned while doing both simultaneously? 

Obviously the biggest difference is that teaching in the community pharmacy is a more hands on experience in that there’s real life scenarios and people versus teaching in the classroom where there’s only the lecturer, student, book, and  white board/chalk board to convey the message.

In the classroom there’s the “audience effect”. You’re lecturing, and you can easily become the only speaker if there’s not a question you give your audience to answer.  Thus, you have to exert more of your body and brain energy into focused segments to convey an effective message.

This burden of energy expenditure being on the speaker/lecturer can be lightened only by actively engaging the student by using the white board, computer, or book to create examples and questions of real life scenarios.

Energy expenditure while teaching in the pharmacy is reduced in comparison to the classroom. The drugs, the patients, the real life scenarios are there to be be used as living examples of why the student must study physiology, pharmacology, infectious disease, pharmaceutics, and so on and so forth.

The student can easily view the drug by going to the shelf. They can learn the pharmacology and use of the drug by simply looking at the package insert that comes with the drug. They can observe the practicing pharmacist or pharmacy technician and learn from their behaviors, movements, speech, and thought process in working together as a team to produce the appropriate final product. The examples do not have to be created in the pharmacy — because the examples are there to be observed, studied, learned, and memorized for the present and future use with patients that day and the days ahead.

This accumulation of knowledge by the pharmacy student and pharmacy technician while on externship can produce a foundation of knowledge for how to talk, when to talk, when not to talk, and when to act.

First point… Good teaching isn’t a lecture, it’s a conversation.

Second point… Good teachers find common ground with the student — so that the thoughts expressed by the teacher can be easily understood by the student.

Third point…Good teachers find out what their student’s baseline of knowledge is.  By understanding their current knowledge or lack thereof — the Good teacher can elevate and motivate the student to an appropriate and/or desired level of competency.

Conclusion — I have a long way to go in becoming identified as one of the “good teachers”. However, I’ve identified these three points too consider while playing this role.

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Sam Blakemore is the Pharmacy Manager of Peds Rx Pharmacy Solutions. Connect with him via: LinkedIn

The increasing use of DAW 9 and it’s potential impact on pharmaceutical care…

The Dispense As Written Codes that I use regularly in my practice are:

DAW 0 = NO PRODUCT SELECTION INDICATED

DAW 1 = SUBSTITUTION NOT ALLOWED BY PRESCRIBER

DAW 9 = SUBSTITUTION ALLOWED PLAN REQUESTS BRAND

Why is this important?

Dispense as written codes are important in billing/filing claims correctly to a patient’s insurance plan. Claims must be billed/filed correctly so that patients receive the appropriate drug products at the correct price.

For me… DAW 0 is used most of the time (this holds true for most pharmacists), while DAW 1 is used sparingly; a drug example for those who are not Pharmacists as to when a Pharmacist uses DAW 1 is seen in the case of  prescribing Brand Name Synthroid. Prescribers often write for Brand name Synthroid instead of Levothyroxine because this drug has a Narrow Therapeutic Index (NTI). Due to the NTI, formularies often include both the Brand and Generic products on their formularies so that patients receive appropriate pharmaceutical treatment for their thyroid conditions.

If you’re interested in reading more about NTI, please visit the FDA’s website and review the powerpoint “Quality and Bioequivalence Standards for Narrow Therapeutic Index Drugs.

So…DAW 9?

DAW 9 is increasingly becoming popular and being put into place by Pharmacy Benefit Managers (PBM’s). Typically generics have been dispensed because the generic product is the cheaper alternative when compared to the brand name product. However, increasingly manufacturers have been offering PBM’s rebates for the monies that they pay the pharmacies on the drugs cost.

In short…even when prescribers write a prescription and sign Product Substitution Permitted — the pharmacist must dispense the brand name product for the product to be covered by the patient’s insurance. This is done by changing the computer DAW code from a 0 to a 9.

So you may be asking, “how is it more profitable for the PBM’s to have higher priced drugs on their drug formularies?” I found a great article published by NCPA entitled “PBM Revenue Streams and Lack of Transparency”. The article is a quick read and outlines why Brand Name products continue to be on formulary even when a generic competitor enters the market.

Examples of using DAW 9 in my practice (Generic Drug — Condition Treated)

Dexmethylphenidate ER — ADHD

Diazepam Rectal Gel — Seizures

Methylphenidate ER — ADHD

Budesonide Respules — Asthma

What’s the effect on people and the market?

In my practice this leads to a major consultation point…

  • You and/or your family member is on a drug that insurance is requiring that Brand Name be dispensed (DAW 9). I’m not sure if your local pharmacy carries the Brand Name or Generic product. Thus, it is imperative that you contact your pharmacy days in advance to ensure this product is in stock when you attempt to refill your medication. If you don’t call ahead of time, this could potentially delay when you receive your medication, which could lead you to become non-compliant with your medication(s).

The reason that this is so important…

  • Finding the medication for your patient is important…but ensuring that your patient has access to this medication is just as important. If they can’t obtain or access the medication, then you can’t ensure their compliance on the medicine. And non-compliance ultimately can lead to hospital readmission.
  • When patient’s transition from an inpatient admission to being discharged to the outpatient setting, prescribers are often unaware of what’s on or not on the patient’s drug formularies. This can lead to confusion and delay and/or impede discharge planning which can potentially lengthen their hospital admission.

DAW 0 versus DAW 9 seems like such a trivial issue, but the increased prevalence of this small change can impact our patient’s compliance and can drive up the cost for providing healthcare.

If you have Questions related to this topic? Please feel free to leave a comment.

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Sam Blakemore is the Pharmacy Manager of Peds Rx Pharmacy Solutions. Connect with him via: LinkedIn

 

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How to determine if a candidate “cares”..

How to determine if a candidate “cares”..

The interview begins—and you have already reviewed the candidate’s resume’. They meet all the qualifications, and even have some excellent references. You hire the candidate, and around six months to one year later after their up and down performance you and the employee decide that it’s best to part ways.

So what happened? The interview went well…check. The references seemed to be great…check. Yet, once the candidate got the job — they had a fatal flaw that was impossible to overcome.

They just didn’t seem to care.

They didn’t care about the customers, didn’t care about their daily performance, didn’t even seem to care about their evaluations… Which ultimately meant that the product they were serving up to your loyal base was average at best. They had just enough good days to make you think maybe it would work out, interspersed with enough bad days to make you shake your head.

It’s pretty weird when you think about it. And naturally, you have to feel a bit disappointed. Typically, I’ll even replay their interview over in my mind; trying to figure out what I missed during my evaluation. Going through this process forces the manager to ask themselves what checkboxes are the most important to be checked before making a commitment to offer the candidate a position.

A few days ago, a colleague reminded me of her words on the hiring process prior to me taking on a management position. She’s held multiple management positions. And she said, “when you hire someone, find a person with good customer service…if the person has good customer service, you can typically work around some of their deficiencies…”

I would add to her statement — that the job candidate’s deficiencies can even be remedied with appropriate teaching and training. So, then the manager must ask themselves, “am I a good enough teacher/trainer to remedy the candidate’s deficiency or do I currently have someone on staff that can be an appropriate educator/mentor for the job candidate?”

I don’t know of any degrees/diplomas to my knowledge that are being conferred by colleges and universities in the field/study of CARING @ WORK. Thus, what questions could be asked to determine if a candidate meets your standards? I guess… you could simply just ask the magical question, “do you care… or will you care? But, unfortunately you will most likely just get a canned answer.

So I suggest going through what-if scenarios with your candidate using a diagram for what you consider to be right and wrong answers for each of your scenarios. This I believe is the best method for gaining a little more insight into determining if a candidate truly possesses the traits required to serve your customer base.

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Sam Blakemore is the Pharmacy Manager of Peds Rx Pharmacy Solutions. Connect with him via: LinkedIn

Writing in Plain English…

Learning how to write in plain English has been one of the most useful concepts I have learned. Effective written communication is a business litmus test. If done well, it can help the business professional build their personal brand.

Plain English is defined in Wikipedia as being…

A style of communication that uses easy to understand, plain language, with an emphasis on clarity, and avoidance of complex vocabulary.

Personally, this has been extremely important to me in the following areas:

  1. Writing business emails to convey a message the reader can easily understand.
  2. Writing incident reports to convey a message that anyone could understand.
  3. Designing business correspondence to customers regarding new services.
  4. Designing operations & workflow management forms to ensure quality employee performance that leads to better customer service.

Thus, out of respect to the the art of writing in Plain English this is the conclusion of this blog post.

For further information click this. And if you really get bored and want to read a book — I would suggest the following, Writing & Speaking at Work by Edward P. Bailey.

Regards, Sam

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Sam Blakemore is the Pharmacy Manager of Peds Rx Pharmacy Solutions. Connect with him via: LinkedIn

How to approach meeting someone for the first time…

So…what do you do for a living?

We all have our canned answers to describe ourselves to the strangers that ask us this question. So…I suppose for a moment, pause and reflect upon the answers you have given throughout the years.

Think of those times you were hesitant to state your job title; and also think of those times you were proud to state your job title. Consider the times you were either happy, sad, or indifferent when someone asked you “what do you do for a living.”   One thing is for certain; professional competence, college diplomas, jobs, and socio-economic status do not correlate to happiness, fulfillment, and satisfaction.

We are all on a wave but each person’s wave has different lengths. Being self aware and cognizant of this fact provides each of us with small boosts to our emotional intelligence score.

The dreaded “first impression” can certainly have different outcomes when you’re able to live in the moment of a conversation instead of replaying canned questions and answers.

If we agree that human beings are much more than job descriptors and titles; consider your own life story…

If someone had to introduce you in front of an audience; would you expect them to come to the microphone and blurt out your job title and degrees… then walk away from the microphone and sit back down?

Maya Angelou famously said, “At the end of the day people won’t remember what you said or did, they will remember how you made them feel.” Ultimately, that’s what this blog post is about.

When you meet people for the first time, please let the experience be organic. Leave the canned answers and questions in the pantry closet. I have learned from my own personal experiences that this is an important concept to apply in my life. By making this small decision, it has allowed me to not blindly box people into categories or groups—because everyone has their own story to tell.

When you meet a person for the first time, consider this… those diplomas, job titles, and trophies on the mantle are simply short highlights to the various chapters that fill a person’s unfinished book of life.

Take home statements…

  1. You do have a life outside of your career…reciprocate this truth when meeting people for the first time by not immediately going for the “what do you do for a living” question.
  2. Throw the canned questions and answers in the garbage. They will help your conversations be more refreshing and organic.
  3. Instead of asking people what they do for a living, ask instead, “can you please tell me about yourself?” This allows people to have a moment of reflection. They then have an opportunity to decide if they would like to tell you their personal story.

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Author, Sam Blakemore, August 4, 2017.

Who is your customer

Who is your customer

I got into a rather interesting discussion with a friend recently. He works in higher education and asked me the following question after reading my blog post Considering “workplace levers” in office politics

“At a university, who is your customer…the student or the parent of the student?”

My response was quick..

The student is the customer… the college student is around 18 years of age, and thus  has the final decision to attend the institution. Yes, their parents have great influence in their college decisions; but it’s my opinion that colleges must treat the student as the customer because they’re the folks attending class, living on campus, and being active members of the student body.  Additionally, many student’s take on student loan debt even when parents do have the ability to make payments towards their children’s college education.

Ultimately, students graduate and become alumni. The alumni hopefully become donors to continue the advancement of the institution. If the university mistakenly treats parents as the customer throughout these formative four to five years the student is on campus—there is the potential that the graduates won’t become actively engaged in efforts to both donate and raise donations.

My friend’s response… 

You’re wrong! Parents are the customers because they’re paying the bills!

Who won this argument you might ask?

This round and round again debate got me thinking…

How often do managers ask themselves, “who is my customer and why?” In my scenario the university is the business and the customer(s) are the student and/or parent.

So the business owner and/or manager has a decision to make.

Three questions…  

  1. Who is my customer and why?
  2. What is the criteria in selecting a customer?
  3. When the customer has been selected; how do we market to this segment appropriately?

A short list of factors to consider when selecting and defining your customer: 

  1. Who is the buyer of goods?
  2. Who is the active shopper of goods?
  3. Who influences the purchase?
  4. Who makes the final decision?

Ultimately, the business has to understand who their customer is to effectively market their product. Effective marketing is tough; as marketing to the wrong audience can have a negative effect on the long term health and growth of the company.

For example…does a children’s toy company create an advertisement campaign geared toward the child or the parent? 

Who is your customer? And what decision trees did you employ to come to your conclusion?

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Sam Blakemore is the Pharmacy Manager of Peds Rx Pharmacy Solutions. Connect with him via: LinkedIn